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Nostalgic: You Are a Child In 90s Playing PlayStation

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Video games are a young form of art and although the first examples of video games were made in the 1950s and 60s, it was only from the 1970s onward that they were a culturally prevalent form of enjoyment. This means that the oldest gamers that can’t remember a world without video games have only just reached the age of 50.

Video games also have clearly defined console generations that are representative of the technological advances that were seen during that time. Everyone that has grown up playing console games will now relate previous generations to previous stages of their life, from the console they played as a teenager, to the console that first fascinated them with games as a child.

The original PlayStation was first released in 1995, which means the people that were first exposed to it as young children are now currently in their 20s or 30s. Now animation has been created in blender by a YouTuber named Distorted Reality, which is meant to stir up feelings of nostalgia specifically for these former PS1-owning kids. The animation is named “POV: You Are a Child In 90s and Playing PS1.” The “POV: You Are…” meme format is famous for conveying a perspective or feeling that many people are likely to have convergent memories of seeing.

The first game clip displayed in the animation is from Resident Evil 3: Nemesis, which was the final main series of Resident Evil games made for the PS1. For many players, the trilogy of PS1 Resident Evil games determined not only the console but the whole survival-horror genre. The next game shown is Tomb Raider, which is an equally famous PlayStation title, and the result of which can still be located in most modern AAA titles that fall under the banner of action-adventure games.

The final game seen in the animation is Need for Speed: High Stakes, which is the fourth game in the Need for Speed series. This game will rarely be found on any lists of quintessential games for the original PlayStation, but fittingly, there may be nothing more telling of being a child with a PS1 in the 90s than having that one game that was amazing which no one else seems to recall or talk about.

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